Common Reed (Phragmites australis)

Common Reed (Phragmites australis)
Common Reed Seed
For quantities over 5 (five) pounds please call TOLL FREE 1 800 826 3655 for quote and shipping costs. Common Reed is available as a live rhizome or seed. The minimum order for rhizomes is 500 at 50 cents per rhizome. Planting rate: 24,000 rhizomes per acre. Shipping is usually overnight and as such our standard rates do not apply. Please contact Freddie Lorenz TOLL FREE 1 800 826 3655 to obtain a shipping quote. Your order will be processed immediately.
Common Reed

Common Reed

Common Reed (Phragmites australis) is perennial wetlands grass that resembles cane. It can reach heights between 6 and 16 feet and tends to grow in thick stands. Despite being coarse, common reed is readily eaten by cattle and horses as it provides a high quality warm-season forage. However, it becomes tough and unpalatable after maturity. Animals that graze this grass during winter should be fed a protein concentrate. Common Reed has been used in the Southwest for lattices in constructing adobe houses.  Indians have used the round, hollow and almost woody stems for making arrow shafts and weaving mats and carrying nets. Common Reed begins to grow in February (this varies with location). New shoots grow from buds at the nodes of old stems and stolons.  Common Reed will also propagate from either its creeping rhizomes or seed. It grows in marshes and swamps, on banks of streams and lakes, and around springs.  It grows best in firm mineral clays and tolerates moderate salinity.  It does best if water level fluctuates from 6 inches below soil surface to 6 inches above The leaves of Common Reed are long – up to 24” long x 2” wide – tapering to a point. During the growing season the foliage is a grayish-green color. Following the first frost Common Reed turns tan and loses the majority of its leaves. However, during winter the stems with their feathery tips remain prominent features. The seed head, located at the end of the stem is 8-16” long and has multiple branches. The plume-like, feathery, purple-brown flower heads gain their appearance from silky hairs growing along the flowers axis. Flowers generally begin to appear by the end of June and are densely arranged along the branches of the plume. Those parts of the plant growing below the waterline provide habitats for both micro and macro invertebrates which are a food source for fish and other animals such as amphibians, reptiles, ducks and geese.  Many species of birds utilize common reed seeds as a food source and use the plant's thick  stands for shelter. [TABLE=55]
Common Reed Leaves

Common Reed Leaves

<p>Common Reed - Close Up of Seed Head</p>

Common Reed - Close Up of Seed Head

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